Graphic Design / Interactive Design / Fine & Applied Arts / Parkland College

Graphic Design Exercises
InDesign: Combining Type

Objective

To learn how to combine two or more typefaces. To learn InDesign's professional typesetting tools by example.

Discussion

The first rule of unity requires that a composition contain as many similar elements as possible. In typography, this means using one typeface. There are plenty of ways to create variety and emphasis using just one typeface: weight, size, position, tracking, all caps, color, etc, etc. So, if at all possible, use only one typeface in your design.

Only when you have explored all options possible for creating emphasis with just one typeface, should you consider a second typeface. And the second font should be used sparingly. When choosing your second font, there is only one rule: contrast. The more contrast, the stronger the emphasis. In addition to choosing a second font that looks different than the first font, you may need to vary the size, weight and color as well.

Tip: Never mix Garamond with Baskerville (or any two serifs) because they are too similar. If you're looking for sublety, use just one typeface. If you're looking for drama, use maximum contrast. Avoid that gray area that is neither subtle nor dramatic as that may convey a mixed message.

Procedure
  1. download InDesign starter file
  2. open downloaded file "combining type.indd" in InDesign
  3. practice Adobe navigation keyboard shortcuts: space=hand; space+cmd=zoom in; space+cmd+opt=zoom out; cmd+zero=fit in window
  4. practice InDesign preview shortcuts: cmd+opt+I (show/hide hidden characters); W (normal/preview mode)
  5. add your name to the top of master page A; return to page 1
  6. read the text
  7. to edit text frames, unlink them from the master page (cmd+shift+CLICK)

page 1

  1. leave the first text frame alone (for comparison purposes)
  2. select the first two words in the other text frames and change font to:
    Baskerville
    Goudy
    Helvetica
  3. record the font names in the caption area; compare the differences between the four text frames

page 2

  1. insert page 2 (window > pages: new page icon)
  2. leave the first text frame alone (for comparison purposes)
  3. select the first two words in the other text frames and change font to:
    bold
    Helvetica LT Std Black, 8pt
    Helvetica LT Std Black, 8pt all caps
  4. record the font names in the caption area; compare the differences between the four text frames

page 3

  1. duplicate page 2 to make page 3 (window > pages: flyout menu)
  2. add a RETURN to the end of the first two words in all text frames
  3. select the first line in each text frame and do the following:
    make font larger
    track tighter
  4. record the font names in the caption area; compare the differences between the four text frames

page 4

  1. duplicate page 3 to make page 4 (window > pages: flyout menu)
  2. change the font of the first line in each text box to the following fonts:
    Franklin Gothic Heavy
    Gill Sans Extra Bold
    Futura Extra Bold
    Futura Extra Bold Condensed
  3. record the font names in the caption area; compare the differences between the four text frames

page 5

  1. duplicate page 4 to make page 5 (window > pages: flyout menu)
  2. in each text frame, choose one font for the text and another font for the head (consulting Parkland's Core Fonts Specimen Sheet
  3. print page 5 only for small group critique
  4. make adjustments based on group critique (if necessary)

grading

  1. submit b&w proof with your name and exercise number on it for grading
  2. file your graded proof in your Process Book for individual review

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Last updated: 3/2/17 ■ Webmaster: Paul Young